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Amarcord 70s
The Decade that shaped us

1976
(Published 15 August 2020)

First a correction.  Our friend Ing Raffaele Achettino reminded us that the Harvest Camp was built in the spring of 1974 and not in 1975. I apologize for the confusion. He also recalled that in one of the many ceilings we cleaned a "historical relic" was found: an old rifle from the late 18th/early 19th century, perhaps dating back to the French invasion. At the time Don Peppino took it to have it restored. We don't know what happened afterwards.

We also thank Raffaele who also sent us a series of photos which he keeps on a CD. It seems to be almost all the ones that Don Peppino had attached to the wall of the sacristy in Capomoschiano and which I mentioned previously. They can all be seen in our 1970s photo album by clicking here. In particular, Don Peppino had already led a group of his boys on Monte Pizzone since 69/70 and erected a wooden cross under which he celebrated Mass. Since then I believe this has been an annual or almost annual event. One photo in particular I find very beautiful and reminds me of some photos of Don Lorenzo Milani. The one where he celebrates mass surrounded by his boys.

'76 had arrived and we were looking for new things. It was decided that we would celebrate Carnival differently that year. Mindful of the celebrations of the 60s (which still wander in my memory because as a child my aunts took me to watch them from the Pacia family's balcony in the square) we wanted to revive the "Zeza" tradition. We got together and once again organized the Zeza cantata, the weaving of the pole and a "procession" for Moschiano, all rigorously masked. I remember that for "the Carnival funeral" we borrowed the coats from the members of the Capomoschiano and Croce Congregations.  See Photo

In the summer, with the decision of the Constitutional Court of 1976 on the so-called "free radios", the idea of creating one up at the Sanctuary also came to us. On the other hand, who had a better position than ours?  With the financial help of some entrepreneurs from Moschiano and other people (among others Sabato Pacia, Gabriele Borrasi, Mons Olindo Pacia. and Don Salvatore and Don Peppino themselves) we bought a transmitter which was not so powerful but good enough to be able to be heard for the wall and beyond. Certainly it could also be heard from Naples. The antenna was on the ceiling of the Church near the Cross while  the "Studies" were in the 2 rooms on the first floor under the current caretaker's apartment. We spent the whole summer setting up the studios with the classic egg cartons covering the walls to make them soundproof (still an art of making do). Then one day in September we started with the broadcasts. Radio Onda Verde was born. At the beginning we broadcast on FM 97.00 MHz but then we changed to FM 101.1 MHz. We were on the air every day or almost but only for a few hours in the afternoon given the distance from Moschiano and the commitments that each of us had. On Saturdays and Sundays, however, it is broadcast almost all day. We alternated songs, news, discussions of general interest, sports news, etc. Sometimes we also had "special reports" like the one on November 4th where we interviewed and recorded the testimonies of the last Moschiano survivors of the great war. Helping us and guiding us was a journalist: Guido Sperandeo, nephew of the Bishop His Exc. Matteo Sperandeo.  The initiative was a great success especially in the valley. Everyone wanted dedications, to listen to their favorite songs or simply to be mentioned on the radio. I remember that once the Lauro Police with the dear Marshal Trematerra also came to visit us, to our great pleasure. Another day however we had some let's say "technical difficulties". Something was wrong. The transmitter turned on and off intermittently. We didn't know what to do. Marshal Sabatino Trinchese from Ima helped us and took us to an electronic engineer on Lake Patria to try to understand what had happened and if necessary fix the transmitter. He didn't find any faults but gave us some useful tips to improve the signal. When we returned to the Carita we tried to understand where the fault was. In the end we discovered that the cable under the antenna had become loose and with the wind the connection was not always there. We fixed it and everything went back to how it was before. Now we could make everyone listen to "Sabato Pomeriggio" by Baglioni, "Ancora tu" by Battisti or slightly more involved songs like "La Locomotiva" by Guccini and many many other songs.

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1976 Carnevale 2

1976 Carnevale 2

1976 Carnevale

1976 Carnevale

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